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Statement by Minister Leitch on North American Occupational Safety and Health Week

OTTAWA, (Canada NewsWire) -- The Honourable Dr. K. Kellie Leitch, Minister of Labour and Minister of the Status of Women, today challenged all Canadians, especially employers and employees, to help prevent injuries and illnesses in the...


OTTAWA, (Canada NewsWire) — The Honourable Dr. K. Kellie Leitch, Minister of Labour and Minister of the Status of Women, today challenged all Canadians, especially employers and employees, to help prevent injuries and illnesses in the workplace, at home and in the community. She made the statement upon the launch of North American Occupational Safety and Health Week, which is held from May 4-10, 2014:

“This annual initiative raises awareness about the importance of preventing injury and illness in the workplace.This year’s theme-Make Safety a Habit!-focuses on creating positive changes by building safety habits that will reduce or eliminate workplace accidents. Proper education and training is an important step in eliminating hazards and reducing risks in the workplace. It encourages responsible decision-making and promotes a proactive health and safety culture. To encourage young Canadians to get involved and help spread the word about workplace health and safety, the annual “It’s your Job!” video contest was launched earlier this year.

Every person, no matter their age or occupation, has the right to return home to their family safely after their workday. In the federal jurisdiction, workplace injuries and fatalities are declining, but one incident is still too many. That’s why it’s important to work closely with employers, employees, unions, stakeholders and other governments to educate workers of all ages. During North American Occupational Safety and Health week, I encourage everyone to take part in the activities planned across Canada to help raise awareness of health and safety in the workplace.

Together, we can make safety a habit!”

SOURCE: Employment and Social Development Canada